Snapchat-1002300857200055790-1-1.jpgMeet A.C. Salter

I’m a daydreamer – always have been and always will be. I was the boy at school who was constantly being told by the teacher to pay attention when my mind was elsewhere having adventures. When I left school, I briefly trained to be a mechanic, but I knew I wanted to see the world. After turning 18, I joined the army and had real-life adventures. Throughout my military career I served in many countries in Europe and the middle East as well as being attached to the special forces for the conflict in Sierra-Lione. But while experiences these real-life adventures, I found that my mind still wandered to creating imaginary worlds and stories. That was when I knew I wanted to be a writer.

Since leaving the armed forces, I settled down in the Cotswolds and now live with my loving wife and four children, as well as a grumble of three pugs.

Links: My website is www.acsalter.com Where you can also buy personalised signed copies of my books.
I’m also on twitter – https://twitter.com/adriansalter315
Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/authoracsalter

 

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The Interview

“… when the darkness whispers her name – Run!” This gave me chills! How did Eversong come to be?

Like a lot of writing projects, I had embarked on in the past, Eversong started out as something completely different. Many years ago, I attempted to write a fantasy novel based around warrior judges known as Shadojaks. It was set in the world of Thea and had the usual elves, fairies, ogres and fire breathing dragons. But as it was my first novel, I struggled to complete it. My mind being what it is, I had already plans for another book which was set in our own world and was more of a paranormal thriller. It was some years later, and a few more failed attempts at finishing the book, that I realised that it was more an urban fantasy and as the story went on – inside my head at this point – I brought in characters and sub-plots from my original book and Eversong simply flowed out with ease.

 

Why did you pick the sense of hearing, and in conjunction the usage of songs, to portray your MC and as a major plot theme?

The usage of songs, or in particular – the Eversong – came about as an idea born from Elora (the main protagonist) herself. Eversong was sung originally by the god Minu, thousands of years ago at the foot of the well of redemption. It was a kind of spell to ward of evil and keep the worlds in equilibrium. If Minu was to stop singing, a darkness would descend upon mankind and throw the worlds into Chaos. Descendants of Minu continued the song, never once allowing it to end and so it went on until the present day. Somehow Elora knew the song and sung it herself outside Gloucester Cathedral, becoming the catalyst for events that would bring the worlds of Earth and Ethea together.

 

Has your experience in the army helped or hindered any battle scenes you write?

My experience in the army helped a great deal when writing a battle scene or action sequence. Although sometimes there might be a fight between an elf and human, sword and gun, I tried to keep the action as real as possible – having a knowledge of weapons and their capabilities was a help. But also, the emotional side of the army helped: long lonely hours alone, the hard turmoil of struggling alongside a brother soldier, feeling utter exhaustion and pushing yourself to the brink of your abilities in enemy territory. And the fear that comes with knowing that somebody is trying their hardest to kill you.

 

What do you think are the most important and least important things to remember while writing a trilogy?

I think the most important thing to grasp while writing a trilogy is that you have enough material, or at least a general sense of where the story is going and how book three ends. Before finishing Eversong, I already knew the ending of Ethea (Book 3). This also helps with any twists you want to put in. Having said that, there is a joy to letting your characters have freedom. Some of my better twists have come about by giving free rein to my protagonist and allowing them to speak for themselves.

 

Is there any future projects that you can share with us today?

I’ve at least another five books to follow the trilogy, although these won’t be another trilogy, but a continuation of the series. Winters End, which I am currently writing, shall be released in June. Dylap, a fairy-tale that was released last year shall also have another two books to follow. Subsequently, I’ll be offering the ebook version of Dylap for free in a promotion in May.