Guest Post: “Why Write YA Fiction?” By Christine Rees

Meet Christine Rees.

CHRISTINEREES_AUTHOR

Canadian teen fiction author Christine Rees is a Western University graduate, Sheridan College alumni, animal enthusiast and lover of all literature. Christine is passionate about helping other writers find their voice and challenging themselves. She spends her free time writing books with a cat nestled in her lap or a large dog encouraging her procrastination. Christine’s debut YA novel The Hidden Legacy and its sequel The Broken Rivalry are paranormal stories filled with romantic inklings and suspense.

Social Media Links:
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https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/16212352.Christine_Rees
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Website:
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The Guest Post.

Why Write YA Fiction?

As a teen fiction author, this is the most common question that I’m asked. My response to this is, why not?

YA fiction revolves around the concepts of growth, change, and self-discovery – many of which we are familiar with. The truth is, YA fiction isn’t just for teenagers. Not anymore. Almost 70% of teen fiction readers are over the age of 18. That’s a large number of readers that are outside of the targeted age group, and there’s a number of reasons for choosing this genre over others.

First and foremost, YA fiction either relates to a teenager’s current situation or cultivates nostalgic feels for older readers. Remember the butterflies in your stomach the first time you held your crush’s hand? What about the unbearable pain of your first heartbreak? First time experiences are powerful and continue to remain so in literature.

Secondly, teen stories can implant serious, dark, and highly emotional undertones that relate to readers of all ages. Many YA readers and writers relate to widespread themes throughout the genre because they don’t necessarily view themselves as adults. Growth and change continue throughout our lives. This doesn’t fade as you get older. For example, the feelings and challenges that a teen character is facing can highly relate to what a twenty-something reader is currently dealing with. This may create a bond between a fictional character, a reader, and their situation regardless of the book genre.

So, why do I focus on teen fiction?

Because it is one of the most powerful genres out there. This is the time in a character’s life where they go through tough life changes as well as self-discovery. This is also an opportunity for massive character growth, deep-rooted emotions, and life-learning skills.

Books have the power to impact us and our thinking. They provide a new perspective, a way of looking at things that we might not have considered before, and that can help readers through some of their toughest days.

I write teen fiction because it’s the genre I still relate the most to, and I firmly believe that you should write what you know. Whether that’s about loss, first-time joy, popularity, being an outcast, or failures and successes, YA fiction accepts it all.

Book Info.

If you’re interested in reading YA fiction, check out my debut best-selling and award-winning novel, THE HIDDEN LEGACY and its recently released sequel THE BROKEN RIVALRY:

The Broken Rivalry3D-large2

The curse of premonition follows Faye Lithyer, forcing her to witness death—over and over again.

When Faye moves in with her grandmother in Astoria, Oregon, her visions grow stronger. Faye watches a new friend fall victim to a murder in the not-so-distant future and becomes obsessed with preventing it from happening. However, Faye’s insecurity has her undecided whether she should tell her friend about their impending death or hunt down the murderer before it’s too late.

Faye will be faced with an epic choice that threatens to expose her abilities. Will she choose to save her friend from a monster or risk becoming one herself?

Book Buy Links:
The Hidden Legacy: https://books2read.com/u/47xEeE#!
The Broken Rivalry: https://books2read.com/u/mqvK1v

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